Whethan, The Wallflower

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Whethan, The Wallflower

According to Whethan, a wallflower is “someone who feels kind of alone or shy, has no one really to dance with at a party." And, he admits that he feels like one sometimes. However, don’t mistake this awkward producer for anything less than talented. When he isn’t keeping to himself, Whethan is playing to sold-out shows across the country and curating the best vibes from his laptop.

Whethan first became interested in music during middle school when he heard his friend rapping. The production of music followed when he began “messing around” with Garageband on his iPad. Whethan first began releasing remixes and edits on SoundCloud in 2016, and at the ripe age of 16 years old, he became the youngest producer to release a record on the Australian EDM label, Future Classic. After developing within his craft, he caught the attention of dubstep pioneer, Skrillex.

At 19 years old, Whethan is proving himself to be a legend in the making. His music is often categorized as indie/EDM, but he himself is considered colorful. In November of 2018, the producer released his debut EP, “Life Of A Wallflower Vol. 1”, that is the perfect combination of abstract, intoxication, and softness.

Check out “Life of a Wallflower Vol. 1” here and come to Mayfest tomorrow to see Whethan perform!


By Desjáh Altvater

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Why You Should Know Saba’s Name

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Why You Should Know Saba’s Name

The single the one that wasn't as honest, but this is what they say make you the hottest in the game, grey” — “GREY” by Saba off of the “CARE FOR ME” album.

Like most, my first encounter with Saba came on Chance the Rapper’s hit single “Angels” where Saba sang the infamous hook “I got Angels all around me they keep me surrounded.” Angels refers to many people, but, for the most part, it represents the kids of Chicago. Saba, like Chance, was born in Chicago and represents his community to the fullest in his music and attitude. He runs in crowds of other Chicago rappers including Noname and Smino, and has recently dropped a project titled, “You Can’t Sit with Us” with his own group of Chicago rappers called Pivot Gang. It's been four years since I was swept up by Saba’s deep smooth butter like voice on “Angels” and two albums later I believe he doesn’t receive the credit he deserves. Saba has one of the most unique voices and flows in the current rap scene. Pair that with his poetic lyrics, his motivation to be a storyteller, and his voice for his community puts him close to my top five. Here’s why you should know Saba’s name.

First and foremost, he’s poet. Yes, he's a rapper, but he's a poet. His unorthodox flow combined with heavily jazz influenced instrumentals give him more room and beats per measure to spend filling with interesting rhyme schemes and meaningful lyrics as opposed to if he was rapping over a basic trap beat. This is evident on tracks like “In Loving Memory,” the opening track to his first album “Bucket List Project.” Read this to get a sense of what I am speaking to.

Turn a obstacle obsolete

I believe I can fly, "R Kelly", awkwardly

Ain't really popular, prolly 'cause, they all doubted

But I was up while they slept

While they said I wouldn't amount to much, I was hit

I knew that if I ain't older, I turn a obstacle obsolete

Up the street where they bang, I ain't hang

Out the jam, wap da bam, I'll pretend all our friends still alive

Still apply for the fall, cap and gown, for the fail

Furthermore, first of all, curtain call, shirt and tie

I could try to analyze this, but I am no poetic scholar to claim I understand all of Saba’s wordsmithing. I put this here to instead show how Saba’s rhyme scheme and message is unique. Another way that Saba separates himself from others is his ability to utilize jazz and live instruments in almost all of his instrumentals on his newest album “CARE FOR ME.” Having beat switch ups into swing with improvised trumpet lines on tracks like “GREY” or mashing upright bass lines with trap beats to create a lo-fi vibe on “LIFE” are just some of the ways he accomplishes this.

Saba is an important artist for our generation because he is a storyteller. Originating from Chicago, Saba raps about gang violence in his area and the turmoil it has caused his family. He doesn’t stop there; Saba has songs on the dissonance technology can cause in “LOGOUT” (ft. Chance the Rapper) and his relationship turmoil and self confidence in “BROKEN GIRLS.” Possibly his best example of storytelling in music and one of the most impactful songs I have heard in years is “PROM/KING,” which tells the story of how his cousin, Walter, was murdered over gang related issues. Saba is a force to be reckoned with and I wouldn’t be surprised if in a few years we were saying his name with just as much weight as Chance.

Come to Mayfest to see Saba perform Care for Me live as well as other tracks from Pivot Gang and Bucket List Project.

By Jackson Siporin

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Who is Adult Mom?

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Who is Adult Mom?

Adult Mom has the indie rock dream origin story. As the stage name of Steph Knipe, an artist who attended Purchase College, Adult Mom started with the release of their EP “bedroom recordings” on Bandcamp in 2012. As the name suggests, Knipe recorded the EP in their bedroom after feeling inspired one night. Thus, began Adult Mom, a project that has continued with a slew of self-released EPs to two full-length albums on the label Tiny Engines.

Adult Mom captures the beauty and depth of small moments. From the smell of Old Spice left on a jacket to a winter’s snow to heating up frozen mac and cheese, Adult Mom’s lyrics are a look at old memories with nostalgia over the lines of their guitar. Comparisons to Frankie Cosmos and Cyberbully Mom Club are often brought up, but Adult Mom is more than those comparisons. Their music is a paradox of bouncy instrumentals and introspective lyrics that melds together to create indie rock that’s perfect for driving around on a summer day or dancing to in Walnut Park during Mayfest! It’s refreshing to see an act so honest. Knipe sings frankly about adolescence in a way that is genuine; they speak from their own experience on love, exploring one’s identity, and all the messiness that comes with growing up.

Knipe has always been musical. Their dad and uncles were musicians and they grew up performing in local musical theatre company’s productions. They began playing guitar at 15, long before they became Adult Mom. The name Adult Mom stems from Knipe being the “mom friend” of their group, and not being quite sure if they even feel like an adult or a mom. Over the years, Knipe has grown up, but they haven’t lost the introspection and youthful candor that makes them so incredibly gripping.

Over the years, Adult Mom has toured tirelessly, building up a following naturally and growing into their own skin. They’re able to write their own narrative, turning experiences of heartbreak and pain into projects that allow you to listen to and understand. Growing up is scary, discovering yourself is scary, and Adult Mom feels that too. In the words of Knipe themselves, their music is about “growth and acceptance… growth, acceptance, and recovery.” Want to know where to start with Adult Mom? There’s “Survival,” a song about coming out and not fitting in, or “Ode To One Night Stands,” which is about exactly what the name suggests, or fan favorite “Be Your Own 3am,” a testament to loneliness in winter.

Don’t miss Adult Mom perform at Mayfest this Friday in Walnut Park!

By Mackenzie Glaubitz

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Khalid: The Rise of the 21-Year-Old R&B Sensation

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Khalid: The Rise of the 21-Year-Old R&B Sensation

With his feel-good melodies and messages of being young and living free, Khalid has grabbed the attention of young listeners as well as pushed R&B to new heights.

“Location was definitely the start of everything, people who look like me and the majority and aren’t making music like that — it was different for a lot of people so they didn’t know where to place it.” In an interview with Hot97 radio, Khalid touched on being thrown into the industry overnight with his smash hit “Location” and making music that can fall into multiple genres. Khalid's debut project, “American Teen,” debuted in 2017 and since then, he has topped R&B charts but his melodies aren’t just one dimensional. Khalid has all sorts of nods to genres like hip hop, 80’s techno, pop, and rock. He has collaborated with producers with backgrounds in folk and rock. Most recently, Khalid has dropped his third and most anticipated project “Free Spirit” which made him the first artist to claim the first five rankings of Billboard’s Hot R&B song chart.

Khalid grew up within a military family and thus moved around without staying in one place for too long. He was born only an hour outside of Syracuse in Northern New York before he moved to Heidelberg, Germany for 6 years. Finally, he moved to El Paso, Texas for his senior year of high school — it is El Paso that Khalid has the most affinity for. Khalid’s music often has small elements of folk and southern flare, a characteristic of Texan music, and Khalid even dropped a seven-song extended play called “Suncity” as an ode to his home. El Paso is at the root of all of Khalid’s music. You can hear this on tracks like “Saturday Nights” with R&B melodies that feature country style guitar riffs spliced with techno beats to create, as Khalid said, a genre that “people don’t know where to place.”

In that same Hot97 interview, Khalid opens up about the struggle of being black and the seemingly definite labels that try to place him in one category. He often felt as though record labels tried to conform him into a certain image or stereotype because of what he looked like. “[Record labels] said let’s work with the R&B thing… the pop thing is a little to far one side… because I’m black of course.” This is just a small hint of the deep seeded awareness and maturity Khalid has. It is further astounding to think that he only began his career three years ago. Recognizing and dealing with racial stereotypes from well-founded industry executives while continuing to release music every year is no small feat and it is why he is so celebrated by his peers and his community.

If you're looking for something to listen to, truthfully “Suncity” right now is my favorite tone that Khalid has created. Everyone can get behind someone writing a love letter to their hometown. Nevertheless, “Free Spirit” is the most relatable for a college student. We’re all on a journey of self-discovery which can be extremely exhausting at times. Listening to Free Spirit, I often found it reassuring to see one of my idols navigating similar situations and problems as me. Khalid also is pushing his creativity forward and trying new ideas. He uses a vocoder on the track “Better” as a guitar solo going full Kanye “Runaway” on it, then arranging that solo to flow directly into the witty light synths on “Talk” which make you feel lost, and like you’re floating in the clouds —  the exact message of the track. It is these subtle messages and innovative styles that make it his most mature album. If you’re looking to let loose and have fun “American Teen” is always a bop and an easy listening experience. Feeling nostalgic for our days in high school and the dissolving of responsibility, Khalid is the perfect artist for a college crowd. His dialogue is relatable, but not cheesy and his ability to utilize different genres makes him appeal to a diverse audience. He is a leader in the black community as well a symbol for young kids everywhere that are tinkering around on their guitar or singing quietly in the shower that they can make an impact in the industry. All that combined with his discography and his astronomical potential make him someone that we all need to keep tabs on.

Catch Khalid at Block Party April 26th to see all of this live.

By Jackson Siporin

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A Little Late with Lilly Singh

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A Little Late with Lilly Singh

Here comes Superwoman!

“What’s up, it’s your girl Superwoman,” is a phrase Lilly Singh can be heard saying during the intro of her mega famous Youtube Channel: IISuperwomanII. Nevertheless, instead of greeting millions of viewers through her channel, Singh will soon be saying, “what’s up” on her very own talk show.

In September, Singh will be joining the late-night boys’ club as she is about to become the only woman with a late-night show on one of the Big Four broadcast networks. Besides hosting A Little Late with Lilly Singh, the star is also set to be executive producer of the 1:30am series.

Born and raised in Scarborough, Ontario, Singh is the daughter of two Indian immigrants. Growing up, she describes herself as a tomboy and began making YouTube videos as an outlet to express her feelings. Her ability to connect with viewers around the world proved her right when viewers subscribed increasingly in a short amount of time. Currently, her YouTube channel has 14 million subscribers and 3 billion views so there is no doubt that she will be a supercalifragilisticexpialidocious host. 

But don’t think it stops there. In 2013, Singh embarked on a career in hip-hop releasing numerous songs including the popular, #LEH. In 2015, Singh embarked on her world tour, "A Trip to Unicorn Island,” and recorded her life turning the footage into a documentary under the same name. Besides appearing in Maroon 5’s “Girls Like You” music video, Singh voiced two unicorns named Bubbles and Misty in the animated film “Ice Age: Collision Course” and starred in HBO’s 2018 film adaptation of “Fahrenheit 451.” AND, Singh is officially a #1 “The New York Times” Bestselling author from her first book, “How to Be a Bawse: A Guide to Conquering Life.” 

Can you say girl power?

lilly singh.gif

By Desjah Altvater

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Who is Rico Nasty?

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Who is Rico Nasty?

You’ve seen her name on the Block Party lineup. Now it’s time to get acquainted.

Rico Nasty isn’t your average 21 year old.

Born Maria-Cecilia Simone Kelly and an only child from Maryland, Nasty was surrounded by rap music. Her father was a rapper, and raised her on artists like Nas and Beyonce while she was growing up, artists that have strongly influenced her music style. She began rapping in high school, releasing her first mixtape “Summer’s Eve” when she was a junior. Since then, Nasty has released five more projects, with her most recent (and most famous) being 2018’s “Nasty.” She’s also released a variety of singles and hopped onto songs with artists from Injury Reserve to Doja Cat, making her one of the most ambitious artists in rap today.

Rico Nasty also isn’t the typical rapper. Aggressive and brash, she rap-yells over metal-inspired beats creating a style that you’ve definitely never heard before. Her songs are more suited for moshing than the club, and she’s amassed a core fanbase that resonates with her style. Nasty shows will leave you bruised with your adrenaline pumping, which is why we’re lucky to have her for this year’s Block Party. With a style that involves multi colored wigs, spiked up hair, and punk outfits, you’re able to pick her out of a crowd.

Nasty is more than her persona, though. At 18, Nasty and her then-boyfriend Brandon found out she was pregnant with her son, Cameron. A few months before Cameron’s birth, Brandon unexpectedly passed away from an asthma attack. Nasty doesn’t like to publicly talk about the tragedy; the one glimpse into her feelings is in her Fader documentary, “Countin Up,’” which centers around her life outside of music. In the film, she shows two of her tattoos, a moon and “Keep Thy Heart” in cursive — both tattoos that Brandon used to have. A strong woman, Nasty was able to pick herself up when Cameron arrived. Now 3-years-old, Cameron is Nasty’s pride and joy; she used her first check after signing with Atlantic Records to buy him toys! She’s a kind mother, with her documentary capturing the intense love she feels for her young son. It’s easy to forget that she’s a mother, but it’s easy to remember that she’s a good role model to have, whether it be for her son or for her fans.

There’s a Nasty song for everyone. Her mixtapes “Sugar Trap” and “Sugar Trap 2” are filled to the brim with her twist on bubbly, upbeat rap, with songs like “Key Lime OG” and “Poppin” admittedly fan favorites. If you’re looking for something harder, there’s her popular single “Smack A B***h,” an ode to rejecting contempt from haters, or the Kenny Beats-produced “Trust Issues.” No matter your music style, you’ll find something that’ll make you fall head over heels for Rico Nasty — I know I have!

Fresh off of a much-buzzed about SXSW run, Rico Nasty is gearing up for a slew of festival performances and a European tour. She hasn’t quite hit the mainstream yet, but with millions of streams on her songs, her festival spots, and a major-label record deal, she’s almost there. Don’t miss your chance to see Rico before she’s super popular for bragging rights and an unforgettable experience. Wear good shoes and get ready to mosh your heart out to Rico’s fire songs in the Carrier Dome!


By Mackenzie Glaubitz

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When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go?  Billie Eilish Album Review: 7/10

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When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go? Billie Eilish Album Review: 7/10

How the 17 year-old alternative star has captured the pop fandom’s love with her first studio album. Behind the age, angsty brand, and charisma — how does the music hold up?

“I have taken out the invisalign, and this is the album...”

Billie Eilish is relatable. Under all of the gothic attitude and lavish designer clothes we are reminded by this record there is still just a teenage girl behind the mic. Eilish’s first studio album “When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go?” features her raspy, harmonic layered voices in her slower songs that resemble a much darker version of Frank Ocean. In her more gritty songs, Eilish utilizes heavy basslines and dance heavy beats to create an ambiance of a vibey night club if it had a goth theme. The tracks are woven between multiple snippets of Eilish laughing and even a quote from Michael Scott from The Office. This playful banter filled with dark melodies creates for a very angsty alternative pop undercurrent which fits exactly into Billie Eilish’s brand.

The album’s first official track “bad guy” sets the tone early. The bassline starts and slowly Eilish layers her voice, followed by another harmony of her voice, then shakers and snaps which develops to the chorus of a synthed melody line that is a perfect hook. This creates a build up effect that makes “bad guy” into somewhat of a hype song. Combine that with the fact that Eilish is teasing a love interest of hers by saying she’s the bad guy and that his girlfriend should be worried about her. This makes the listener feel empowered by Eilish’s confidence and grit. Mix that with a dope hook and slow build up and it becomes an instant anthem.

The next track on the album, “xanny” is my personal favorite on the album. Its intense melodic lines filled with multiple voices of Eilish harmonizing with herself creates a beautiful sense of fullness. It also creates vulnerability at the end when Eilish strips away the other voices and the beat, leaving her own voice exposed and raw. She is talking about her need to stop taking Xanax in order to feel okay with herself. She sings she “doesn’t want to be to intoxicated to not be scared;” she is admitting her insecurities, but doesn’t believe numbing is a proper solution. For a 17 year old who has been abruptly thrown into stardom, this song exposes her level of maturity.

While Eilish’s music does have its moments of novelty, there are some similar songs from her previous EP with no new nuance to them. You can see these similarities to songs like “When the Party’s Over” and Eilish’s smash hit “Ocean Eyes” or “you should see me in a crown” and “COPYCAT.”

Eilish’s music relies heavily on the branding and personality of herself. Rather than letting her music speak for it itself, it feels as though she relies on different ad libs and and television quotes to distract fans from her at times lackluster melodic motifs and ideas. At its best, “When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go?” is a brilliant ode to grunge and dark love songs. The harmonies and well produced drums make for a very easy listening album. At its worst, it feels that Eilish is trying to overcompensate for lack of new melodic ideas with different ad libs of her exemplifying a “totally relatable personality” and gimmicking fans with quotes from beloved TV shows.

I believe Eilish will grow out of this — her ad libs will start to make more sense with the overall theme and message of her album rather than just putting it in for shits. There is no doubt that she is extremely talented and this album is most certainly a bop. Moving forward, I would say as a fan of hers, to her, that less is sometimes more. Creating a holistic album with a concrete theme where the tracks flow into each other seamlessly is something I look forward to seeing from her.


By Jackson Siporin

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Who is Kenny Beats?

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Who is Kenny Beats?

You’ve seen his name on the Block Party poster and you’ve definitely heard his production. It’s time to get to know Kenny Beats.

Greenwich, Connecticut would not seem to be the typical brewing ground for rap’s “prodigal son.” Kenneth Blume III, better known by his stage name Kenny Beats, is proof that is an untrue assumption. Beats is best known for is his work with rap icons such as Rico Nasty, JPEGMAFIA, and Vince Staples.

Long gone are Beat’s EDM days. Nowadays, Beats produces rap, and his signature “Whoa, Kenny!” producer tag has become infamous among fans. Beats isn’t your average producer; he views collaboration as a conversation between the artist and himself; to put it simply — he isn’t trying to sell you a beat. It’s this conversationalist mentality that’s led to some of the most creative albums in rap. Beats worked alongside icon Vince Staples to produce the Long Beach rapper’s much buzzed about FM!, which ranged from Bay Area-tinged beats (“Outside”) to tracks that make you want to party on the beach (“FUN!’”). Further, he’s part of the genius behind up-and-coming rapper (and fellow Block Party artist) Rico Nasty’s distinct metal-tinged style. Beats has produced hits such as “Trust Issues” and “Smack A B***h”, and is currently producing her upcoming project Anger Management (he’s also one of her best friends). He’s also worked with KEY!, Freddie Gribbs, ALLBLACK, 03 Greedo, and 10k Caash, among others.

Standing at 6’7”, Kenny looks more like a NBA player than a producer, and has the drive of one. He dedicates his life to his work; in 2018, he worked on over 100 songs. Kenny doesn’t only supplie the beats — he works with the artist throughout the entire process, from recording to mixing and mastering. Beats has been referred to as rap’s “best studio therapist” as he’s not just a producer to these artists, but a friend and a confidant. He prides himself on the ability to not work for the artist, but cultivate with them. And the result — some of the most inventive rap to hit the scene.

Live shows by him are few and far between, which means Syracuse is extra lucky that he’s making his way up North to perform at this year’s Block Party. Don’t know where to start with Kenny? I’d recommend his multitude of Rico Nasty collaborations such as “Sandy” or “Puff Daddy” by JPEGMAFIA. It’ll only take one listen for you to understand what Kenny Beats is about.


By Mackenzie Glaubitz

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Life and Times of Pusha T

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Life and Times of Pusha T

If You Know You Know

King Push is more than just a rapper who dissed Drake. His smooth lyricism met with hard knock beats agrees with the fact that he is amongst the greatest rappers today. From founding Re-Up Records with his brother, to currently being the GOOD Music president, you can’t beat this all-around music genius if you tried. If you know you know…

Pusha T, born Terrence Thornton, is originally from the boogie down Bronx (Yeeeeeeeeerrrr), but grew up in Virginia when his family relocated as a child. Rap became a part of his life as a teenager, when he and his brother formed the hip-hop group, Clipse. Shortly after forming the group, they rap duo met Pharrell, who helped them secure a deal with Elektra Records and eventually Artista Records. Hit albums are nothing knew for the rap veteran as the 2006 Clipse album, “Hell Hath No Fury,” received critical acclaim and an XXL rating of 5 stars from hip-hop magazine XXL.

Following his departure of Clipse, Pusha T embarked on a solo career, signing with GOOD Music in September 2010. From being featured on numerous rap projects, including Kanye West’s Runaway, it became evident that the Virginia native was making a name for himself. When 2012 arrived the smash record, “Mercy” by GOOD Music, featured Push and was immersed in radio play creating buzz around the rapper’s name. Swerve!

Despite having numerous Billboard charting projects and appearances at Coachella, nothing will ever be more controversial than the release of his third studio album, “DAYTONA.” From an $85,000 album cover showing the bathroom of the late icon Whitney Houston, to revealing Drake’s secret son, you can’t tell me this man hasn’t made himself known. Thanks to his phenomenal work on this album, he was also named the "Best Rapper Alive" by Complex in 2018 for his work on Daytona and diss track “The Story of Adidon.” From discussing the acclaim his Grammy-nominated album has received, Pusha T stated, “‘DAYTONA’ is the product of me just trying to do something that I felt like others haven’t done at this stage in their career.”

Fun Fact: It has been reported that Pusha T created the McDonald’s jingle, “I’m Lovin It”.

Besides music, Pusha T is also an advocate for prison reform, stating “mass incarceration is probably the single most pressing issue that I’ve seen affect my demographic, my people, my culture. I’ve lived through it.” From creating a PSA to bringing awareness through televised interviews, he continues his journey to help end social injustice and mass incarceration.

And while you are staying up all night anticipating CUSE Can!, play this bop on repeat, cause if you know you know (sorry, I had to):

By Desjah Altvater

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Flipp Dinero Spotlight

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Flipp Dinero Spotlight

What do Odell Beckham Jr., Drake’s album “Scorpion”, and Brooklyn have in common? Meet Flipp Dinero, the New York rapper who’s making his way up north for Cuse Can!

Most know Dinero for his breakout hit “Leave Me Alone.” The song is an energetic anthem about someone who won’t just, well, leave you alone! The song was released in March 2018, and gained popularity when Odell Beckham Jr. made an Instagram story of him dancing and jamming out to the tune. That was followed by Golden State Warrior’s Jordan Bell featuring the song on his Instagram story and then international icon Drake citing “Leave Me Alone” as a song that inspired his album “Scorpion.” To no surprise, “Leave Me Alone” peaked at 20 on the Billboard charts and has become a club anthem.

Dinero’s live show can’t be beat, either. His performance of “Leave Me Alone” at the BET Awards was captivating, making the audience fall in love with Dinero’s infectious energy. Dinero is fresh off a run of shows at SXSW, including one at Fader Fort (the music festival’s epitome of cool).

Dinero may not be a household name yet, but he will be soon. With music on the way and a contract with DJ Khaled’s label, Dinero is someone to pay attention to. Don’t miss the chance to see Dinero at Cuse Can! and having the bragging rights to say you saw him before he was super big.

By Mackenzie Glaubitz

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Thou Art Tiffany Haddish

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Thou Art Tiffany Haddish

You think you know her, but you really don't…Comedy Queen. Los Angeles Native. Hustler.

Tiffany Haddish was born to be a star, I mean she’s from Los Angeles after all. However, the beautiful city where dreams are made of was not the kindest to her. After her mother suffered an accident causing brain damage and schizophrenia, being the oldest, Haddish stepped into the role of primary caretaker for her siblings at the age of nine. Then, reaching the beginning stages of puberty at age twelve, she was placed into foster care where she used comedy to help her cope with meeting new people. After masking her pain with laughter for years, at the age of seventeen, she attended the Laugh Factory Comedy Camp which cultivated her desire to take the comedic career route.

While it may seem as if Haddish came onto the scene abruptly, her success has been anything but overnight. Twenty years of stand up shows in comedy clubs, odd side jobs, recurring roles, and uncertainty led to her breakout role in the 2017 comedy, Girls Trip. Ever since playing her popular character Dina, she has starred in The Carmichael Show, Nobody’s FoolUncle Drew, and Night School. On November 11, 2017 Haddish became the first Black female stand-up comic to host Saturday Night Live, and has hosted the 2018 MTV Movie and TV awards. Keep a look out for her reported debut album too.

Though Haddish considers her career “a delicious roasted chicken,” she has many more goals that she aims to accomplish into the future, hopefully turning her chicken into a feast. From admiring Oprah, Haddish aims to build a similar empire that will allow her to be an entertainer while giving back. She recently founded her own production company, She Ready Productions, and has signed a first-look deal with HBO. Haddish also aims to make fifty films by the time she turns fifty, and with eleven more years to go, nothing is impossible for this comedy queen. Another major goal of hers is to give back, previously stating "I want to open up a youth center, a mental health center, and a job training center.”

Despite the massive success that Tiffany Haddish has garnished under her belt, she is still a humble woman from modest beginnings who hasn’t forgotten where she came from. I mean, what other celebrity do you know proudly uses Groupon and has worn the same dress to numerous televised events because it was $4,000 and she demands the bang for her buck?

My point exactly.

Whether or not she will own two intersecting streets and name one “Tiffany” and the other “Haddish” it should be obvious by now that she has made her mark. And to all of the opportunities and possible dates with Leonardo DiCaprio that comes her way…

To support Haddish, donate your new or gently used backpack, suitcase or duffle bag to be entered for the chance to attend a Meet & Greet following her April 6th performance. Donations will be collected on April 3rd and 4th from 2-6pm and April 5th from 10-6pm in the University Union office near the SA and FASA office.

Alternative image description: Photo of Tiffany Haddish against a teal background with the title: “Want to meet Tiffany Haddish?” set above the explanation of the luggage drive. Underneath reads “Donate a new/gently used backpack, suitcase or duffle bag to be entered for the chance to attend a Meet & Greet following her April 6th performance.” Under the donation information is a tan box that reads “Bring your donation to the University Union office (Schine 126) during the following times: April 3rd from 2-6pm, April 4th from 2-6pm, and April 5th from 10am-6pm.” At the bottom, in smaller font, reads “All donations will go to Elmcrest Children’s Center. First 100 students will be notified.”

By Desjah Altvater

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Phone Free Fun

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Phone Free Fun

Take a second and live — at least that’s what Yondr wants from us!


There’s a tendency within the younger generation to feel like everything needs to be uploaded so people know you’re experiencing cool things. There’s that factor of validation that comes with someone swiping up on your story about a concert you’ve attended — yet, the affirmation that comes from living in the moment should outweigh that. I’ve experienced concerts through my phone and I’ve lived through concerts with my phone put away. Ultimately, I’ve found that I’ve had more fun at shows when I’m not worrying about capturing the best pictures or videos. Although I know that I prefer a phone-free experience, it’s hard for me to ignore the temptation to pull out my phone. Enter: Yondr.

Yondr is one of the most exciting new companies in the concert production world. When an artist chooses to use Yondr, all of the audience members are given a special pouch to put their phones and smartwatches in that will automatically lock for the duration of the show. This allows the audience to engage with the performance without distractions, and allows the performer to feel connected to the audience. Yondr is unique because you have your phone in your possession, allowing you to not worry about its whereabouts, but it also makes it easier for you to live in the moment and not worry about what’s going on in the virtual world.

Yondr is becoming more and more popular among legendary artists. Musicians like Jack White, Childish Gambino, and Alicia Keys are fans, along with comedian Dave Chappelle — Yondr has some influential users! Yondr allows you to release your connection to the outside world and be fully present for the event — ultimately creating a sense of community and connection among the artists and the audience. You also get to fully live inside the artist’s world by experiencing their show stress-free.

Yondr will be used at Tiffany Haddish’s stand up set at Cuse Can, which will allow for the Syracuse University community to all get the most out of Haddish’s performance. Haddish is guaranteed to keep you laughing all afternoon long, and you’ll be glad you didn’t miss any of her jokes whilst sending a text or posting on Instagram.

The Tiffany Haddish performance at the Goldstein Auditorium in Schine Student Center will be a phone-free experience. Use of cellphones, smart watches, smart accessories, cameras or recording devices will not be permitted in the performance space.


Upon arrival at the venue, all phones and smart watches will be secured in Yondr pouches that will be opened at the end of the event. Guests maintain possession of their phones at all times, and can access their phones throughout the show at designated Phone Use Areas in the venue. All phones will be resecured in Yondr pouches before returning to the performance space. Guests are encouraged to print their tickets in advance to ensure a smooth entry process.

Anyone seen using a cellphone during the performance will be escorted out of the venue. We appreciate your cooperation in creating a phone-free viewing experience.

By Mackenzie Glaubitz

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How Instagram Culture has Changed How We Consume Music and the Artist

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How Instagram Culture has Changed How We Consume Music and the Artist

With accounts such as Pickup beats and jazz to artist live streaming shows and studio sessions instagram is changing how consumers are being able to access their favorite artist as well as how the image of new artist are being shaped.

On February 9th, 1964, a small band comprised of four no-name British musicians performed on The Ed Sullivan Show. They appeared in the living rooms of Americans across the country through grainy black and white boxes and stole their hearts with what would later be dubbed as rock and roll. Needless to say, the way we fall in love with our new favorite artists has changed dramatically since the days of The Beatles. When understanding at how we develop these connections to different musicians it’s important to acknowledge where they come from and the role that social media has played in that.

Every Sunday night John Mayer hosts a makeshift show from the comfort of his living room through an Instagram live stream. Each week he invites all different genres of artist on. Some of the names include Maggie Rogers, Dave Chappelle and Daniel Caesar. John Mayer is not the only musician to use live streams — bands like Vulfpeck to Mac Miller (RIP) have used this medium to connect with fans more directly. Also contributing to the online music culture, accounts such as PickUpJazz (@Pickupjazz) and PickUpBeats (@pickupbeats) have created their own music communities of musicians all across the world sharing videos and hosting competitions for artists to show off their abilities. This has prompted up-and-coming artists to share more music of themselves on Instagram in hopes to get “picked up” or seen by their favorite artists. This has drastically sped up the process of new artists being discovered and further, signed. Videos of shows on social media have also sprouted up all over social media feeds. Now as a fan you can watch clips of your favorite artist’s live shows before you buy tickets. It has allowed more people to be drawn in to noname artists just based on a few seconds of video interaction. All of these facets have bridged the gap between performer and consumer and have made it easier to fall in love with your favorite artist.

While it is important to acknowledge all the good social media has done for discovering artists and popularizing them, it is equally important to acknowledge the pitfalls of social media presence in creating the artist. In a Hot 97 interview rapper Vince Staples says, “Perception is based on how hot you are or how much money you got. If the general consensus was that we want you to have great music, I promise you, [they] would chill a little bit. But it's not about that. We want to know how much money you got. We got bossip, we got mediatakeout, we got baller alert — we got all of these things. That’s getting more followers and retweets then Def Jam Records, Interscope Records, and the Grammy College. Let's be real, people want to see the lifestyle and that's what makes these rappers and people clamor for the attention.”

The point Staples is bringing up has a lot of weight. With the rise of social media, the focus has shifted away from the music and more to the lifestyle of the artist, especially in hip hop. People are constantly wondering about relationship statuses, clothing decisions and overall brand and image. This has made the artist more attractive to that market more than ever before and it’s hard to blame them. Up and coming artists are going to try to make waves any way they can and if the public is more consumed with what they are doing outside of the studio, artists will appeal to that.

Staples further explains how it has been a long time since we have had a hip hop artist who could keep their personal life private and just let the music speak for itself. He describes these people as the J. Coles, Kendrick Lamars, and Frank Oceans.

Overall it is important to just observe these shifts in the music industry and understand how they occur. More importantly we need to delve into ourselves and observe what we want from of our favorite artist because we, in the end, are what they are marketing their brand to. Do we live in a society where we can let a song speak for itself and not need to deep dive on someone’s Instagram to understand their persona? Or have we become so transparent as a society that it has become a necessity to understand our favorite artists in all mediums, whether in the studio or at home?

By Jackson Siporin

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“Hi This Is Flume (Mixtape)” Review

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“Hi This Is Flume (Mixtape)” Review

A reaction to sitting and listening to the cacophony of sound from Flume’s new mixtape.


I feel like I have to start this review by setting the scene in which I first listened to “Hi This Is Flume (Mixtape).”

Picture this: It’s around 10 pm. I’m in the cafe of my college library, attempting (and failing) to work on multiple essays that I have due during the week. It’s loud (as cafes tend to be), and either I wore too many layers or the heater is turned up too much because I’m overheating. Basically, this was not the environment in which I should’ve enjoyed a dissonant, experimental album, and yet, “Hi This Is Flume (Mixtape)” somehow surpassed that.

Most of the opinions I’d heard about Flume’s new record were that it’s fine; it is neither good nor bad, but it definitely wasn’t Flume’s best work. Because of everything I’d heard, I was shocked that I liked it so much. I’ve never been a huge Flume fan, yet this album felt like a deep dive into his complex mind. His music is unlike most EDM artists out there; artistic and noisey, it takes you on a journey and makes you feel simultaneously uncomfortable and at peace. 

Perhaps two of the most exciting moments on the album come from two of rap’s rising stars. On track 3, entitled “High Beams,” Flume enlists the help of UK up-and-coming slowthai, who energetically raps about his come up over a beat that flows from off-putting hisses to melodic keyboard. Track 8, entitled “How To Build A Relationship,” features one of my favorite musicians JPEGMAFIA. The song features JPEGMAFIA’s signature aggressive flow over a dissonant, dark beat that switches halfway through the song. I’m also a big fan of “Vitality”. Although the song is only 1:39 long, it feels like the next evolution of “Skin; Flume has spent the last three years since that album evolving as an artist, and it shows. 

I’m here for this new Flume. “Hi This Is Flume (Mixtape)” is a risky album because it’s not your typical electronic album; it’s dissonant, complex, and a little scary at times. Is it a perfect album? No, but it doesn’t need to be. This album made me feel ways I never thought electronic music could make me feel; for one of the first times in my life, I found myself connecting to a music genre I was never a huge fan of. This album is intended to break boundaries and to get people outside of their comfort zone, which it succeeds at. “Hi This Is Flume (Mixtape)” is a perfect example for the argument that music shouldn’t be about playing it safe. This album is Flume’s brain packaged into 17 songs; it’s a little messy and quite risky, but it works.

Your first listen of “Hi This Is Flume (Mixtape)” needs to be in one sitting. The songs flow in and out of each other, with the album acting more of a body of work than a collection of singles. Flume made my college’s library cafe feel like nighttime at a summer music festival — a cool breeze on my back and my feet sore from walking all day. I think the reason some people don’t love this new record is that it doesn’t feel meant for casual listening; I think it’s meant to be heard live. Flume’s no stranger to having incredible live shows, from having captivating visuals to an energetic stage presence. I don’t think I’ll full understand this album until I see him play it live, and I’m alright with that. “Hi This Is Flume (Mixtape)” isn’t an album that was made for understanding; it’s an album that was made as a trip through the magic that is Flume’s mind.

By Mackenzie Glaubitz

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Tiffany’s Giving Tree

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Tiffany’s Giving Tree

Funny AND Giving? We love a queen. See how Tiffany Haddish gives back and plans to do so in Syracuse at Cuse Can!


Tiffany Haddish is set to make her Syracuse comedy debut on April 6, in Goldstein Auditorium as part of the “CUSE Can! It Starts With Us” day-long event. While we all know she’s coming to bring the laughs, Haddish will also be offering 100 people the chance to meet her. University Union will be hosting a drive to collect new or gently used backpacks and suitcases for the Elmcrest Children’s Center. The first 100 people to donate will be selected to meet Tiffany Haddish after her legendary performance. 

Committing good deeds has always been a part of Haddish’s life. Long before her breakout success, she faced enormous hardship from being in foster care and living in her car, but depended on comedy to pull her through. At seventeen, she determined that comedy was her purpose when she attended the Laugh Factory Comedy Camp, a place where she still volunteers at. Cuse Can! isn’t the first time Haddish has been connected to a backpack drive. As an advocate for foster youth, in 2017 Haddish partnered with Living Advantage Inc. collecting backpacks and suitcases for foster children to keep their belongings in. By partnering with Cuse Can!, she aims to bring the same effect with the backpack drive to the foster youth of Syracuse. 

I’m not crying, you are.

But, it doesn’t stop there. In 2018, Haddish named the Unusual Suspects Theater Company her charity of choice. Haddish knows first-hand the transformative power performing arts can have on young, disadvantaged children and has worked directly with youth participants. Along with money, she has donated her time to the organization by leading rehearsals and mentoring the kids a part of the program. 

This event is so much more than entertainment because all proceeds will benefit the Hendricks Chapel Food Pantry and Hillside Children’s Center. While you will be living your best life, you will also be helping those in need.  


Cop your tickets and donate. Donations will be collected on April 3rd and 4th from 2-6pm and April 5th from 10-6pm in the University Union office near the SA and FASA office.

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By Desjah Altvater

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Streaming: The Internet Killed TV

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Streaming: The Internet Killed TV

Here are UU’s helpful tips for how to overcome the Internet surpassing cable television as most popular entertainment platform!


Just a few decades ago, the world was chanting along to The Buggles’ “Video Killed the Radio Star.” But in 2019, there is a new phrase that perfectly reflects our times: “Internet killed the TV Star.” When someone asks you what shows you like to watch, I bet that you will name all of the programs you watch on streaming services. Just a few years ago, one would have to turn on cable television to watch a show or a movie, unless they had a physical copy, but not anymore because you can watch anything at any time thanks to streaming. Cause, like, what even is cable?

The art of streaming is so complex and rewarding that competitive industries are unsure on how to keep up. Streaming has completely revolutionized the motion picture industry — whether it be shows, films, or music videos.

Because UU wants the best for you, here is a list of which videos streaming platforms are best and what to watch:


1. NETFLIX (unless you are looking for Disney movies, then, sorry) $8/month

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You can literally watch almost anything your heart desires on Netflix, so please, do yourself a favor a get a subscription if you haven’t (start off with the free-trial). Netflix has:

Stranger Things

Bird Box

Big Mouth

Roma

Black Mirror: Bandersnatch

Fyre: The Greatest Party That Never Happened

Orange Is The New Black

2.   HULU $6/month

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Hulu is the best streaming service when you are looking for television show that can normally be found on cable.

The Handmaid’s Tale

This Is Us

Rick and Morty

Saturday Night Live

Black-ish

Brooklyn Nine-Nine

South Park

How To Get Away With Murder

3. Youtube and Vevo

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Remember the good ole’ days of watching your favorite music videos on MTV in 2010, early in the morning before school, or on VH1? While many of you may not actually go on Vevo, without the service we wouldn’t receive the official artist music videos that we watch on YouTube. Vevo is actually responsible for issuing newly released music videos from your favorite musicians. With their partnership with YouTube, viewers just have to subscribe to their favorite artists’ YouTube channel to access Vevo content. If you haven’t spent at least eight hours on a free Saturday night watching endless YouTube videos and making your way into the dark side of YouTube, then you’re doing life wrong. From music videos and live broadcasts to nostalgic programs and DIY tutorials, you can literally watch anything on YouTube.


While the internet may have killed TV, it has also opened up a world of cheap possibilities. Oh, internet, what would we do without you.

By Desjah Altvater

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R. Kelly, Michael Jackson, and the Cycle of Abuse

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R. Kelly, Michael Jackson, and the Cycle of Abuse

Recent documentaries have exposed the patterns of abuse committed by two superstars. How should we react?

When I was in middle school, I fell in love with jazz and tap dance. I’d go twice a week to my local dance studio and learn dance after dance in preparation for our yearly show. The music my instructors played varied from Top 100 hits to years-old jazz, but one of their favorites was always Michael Jackson. The speakers would blast “Billie Jean” or “Thriller,” and we would dance our middle school hearts out to the popularly-regarded King of Pop.

I can’t say I ever was a Michael Jackson super fan, but he constantly surrounded me. I tried learning the “Thriller” dance when I was 12. I think I cried when he died; if I didn’t, my mom definitely did. One of my first DIY-ed clothing pieces was a distressed Michael Jackson t-shirt. I wasn’t so much raised on Michael Jackson, I more so grew up with him. He was everywhere; his songs played at every school dance, his image was on merchandise in every Target, and his children were always in the news. Michael Jackson was everyone’s childhood, and I never suspected the more sinister things that laid underneath his dreamlike persona.

Jackson’s captivation of young boys isn’t new information. There were allegations of sexual abuse from children in 1993 and 2003, with the ones from 2003 resulting in a trial, yet Jackson was never found guilty and was able to gloss over the drama and continue with his career. The abuse continued to be swept under the rug by the Jackson estate and fans alike, until the recent HBO documentary “Leaving Neverland.”

“Leaving Neverland” didn’t just rip out the rug from under us, it burned it up. The documentary focuses in on two men, Wade Robson and James Safechuck, who were sexually abused by Jackson when they were adolescents. The two describe the years of abuse, both sexual and emotional, they were subjected to at young ages, and the long-lasting impacts it has had on their lives. For the first time since 2003, all eyes were on Michael Jackson’s pattern of pedophilia and abusive behavior, and it’s become clear that whether the public likes it or not, it’s a part of his legacy that can’t be erased.

“Leaving Neverland” isn’t the only documentary that has thrust a popular figure’s pattern of abuse into the spotlight. The Lifetime docuseries “Surviving R. Kelly” centers around R&B superstar R. Kelly’s abuse of girls. Kelly would often lure young girls to him with promises of mentorship and fame, and then take advantage of the girls by making them perform sexual acts. The most notorious instance of this was the “tape,” in which R. Kelly videotaped himself urinating on an underage girl he had promised he would mentor.

Both Jackson and Kelly used their fame to lure in adolescents. When you’re young and hungry for fame, you’re willing to take every opportunity that’s given to you, and if that opportunity is giving to you by a superstar, you’re going to discount red flags in the hopes of reaching your dreams. Children have an innate ability to trust, and to take advantage of that and abuse them is disgusting beyond words.

The details of Kelly and Jackson’s abuse have been public for years because both were put on trial, but both documentaries packaged that information in a way that a broad audience could understand and connect to. The documentaries allow you to witness the victim, their trauma, the pain in their eyes — once you put a human face to an issue, it’s harder to sweep it back under the rug. “Leaving Neverland” and “Surviving R. Kelly” were both highly publicized, garnering lots of media response and public outcry against the two artists. Suddenly, it feels like the whole world is restructuring their opinions of men they’d previously admired, something that was a long time coming.

When “Leaving Neverland” was announced, a common question was: why now? Why years after Jackson has died? Why not after his 2003 trial? Why not in 2014, when Robson and Safechuck were suing the Jackson estate? There’s no easy answer. There’s a lot of factors that play into the timing, but one of the biggest factors seems to be the emergence of the #MeToo movement. More and more artists are publicly called out for their past wrongdoings because the public is more readily prepared to hear and believe victims than ever before. Having an open-minded public is especially important in calling out Michael Jackson for numerous reasons. First, he always seemed remarkably innocent. He was known to be childish and whimsical, spending lots of time building up his now-infamous “Neverland” home to be full of wonders. Second, Jackson was the soundtrack to almost everyone’s childhood. His songs played at graduations, parties, and in teenager’s bedrooms for years. It’s hard to believe that someone you were raised on can be capable of such heinous acts, so it’s natural for an audience to be immediately skeptical. Third, this is one of the largest cases that has arisen where the victims are men. There’s not much attention on the sexual abuse of men in the #MeToo movement due to the understanding that men are seen as sexual beings who are incapable of not enjoying sexual acts. Although some people see it as too late, I think right now is the perfect time for “Leaving Neverland.” The general public seems to have become more and more liberal, which makes them a more accessible audience for stories of sexual abuse committed by an icon, and more likely to believe the victims. 

It’s refreshing to see the world stop supporting R. Kelly and Michael Jackson, from R. Kelly being dropped from RCA to the Children’s Museum of Indianapolis removing Michael Jackson memorabilia. Would it have been better if people stopped supporting these artists when the news of their abuse first broke years ago? Yes. It’s frustrating that it took a documentary and intense media coverage for people to believe the artists’ victims, but we can’t change the past. We can only look forward and construct change so it doesn’t take another Lifetime documentary for people to stop supporting abusers. Change comes from believing victims, whether it be a case as big as Michael Jackson or as small as the sexual assault of a friend.

In both documentaries, victims and other sources described how members of both artists’ teams knew about the abuse, yet said nothing. When the people around an abuser recognize what is happening and don’t say anything, they become bystanders to the abuser’s behavior, whether or not they think it’s wrong. By enabling abuse, bystanders help to make spaces, such as the music industry, feel unsafe to victims. By being a bystander to someone’s abusive behavior, you’re letting the cycle of abuse continue. We need to hold each other accountable — not only those in the music industry, but everyone. Holding people accountable doesn’t only mean speaking out when the situation gets severe. Holding people accountable means calling someone out when they talk down to the women around them, when they grope someone, when they do something that’s often see as “mild.”

It’s ridiculous that R. Kelly wasn’t convicted for the “tape”, but with the recent discovery of a video of him harassing an underage girl, he finally needs to be indicted. We need to stop supporting these artists: stop listening to their music, going to their shows, or engaging with them in any capacity, because that allows abusers to continue to stay relevant and gloss over their wrongdoings. Change comes from the public making it clear that these cycles of abuse can’t continue to go on. We need to start unwinding sexual abuse from the music industry by holding others accountable and not supporting abusers.

By Mackenzie Glaubitz

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The Coolest Women in Rap

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The Coolest Women in Rap

These female artists are breaking barriers in male-dominated hip hop industry!

Rap is one of the most popular genres right now and for a good reason; the genre is consistently evolving, with innovation at every turn. Pioneering some of the most thrilling innovation in rap is coming from women — a traditionally underrepresented demographic in the genre.

Here are our favorite female rappers worth paying attention to:

Rico Nasty

Rico Nasty has been everywhere these past few months, from walking the runway at NYFW, to releasing popular song “Tia Tamera” with Doja Cat, to dropping the sci-fi tinged video for “Roof.” It’s not hard to understand why so many people are captivated with Rico; the 21-year-old Maryland rapper’s aggressive flow and innovative visuals are fresh and exciting.

Tierra Whack

Philadelphia born-and-raised Tierra Whack dropped her debut album Whack World on May 30, 2018 to great critical acclaim. At a short 15 minutes in length, the album is groundbreaking, with Whack rapping about everything from failed love to a dead dog. Since the release of Whack World, Whack has been dropping single after single, each better than the last.

Lava La Rue

London rapper Lava La Rue is creative force to be reckoned with. As one of the founding members of the 15-person collective NiNE8, La Rue has a unique DIY-persona that reflects the youth culture of the UK. La Rue’s lo-fi style is perfect for soundtracking anything from studying to hanging out with friends.

Princess Nokia

Princess Nokia is a New York City icon through and through. Besides making incredible music, Nokia is a fierce advocate for women of color, from calling out racists to advocating for intersectional feminism. It’s Nokia’s unique sound and passion for social justice that has made her an important part of the alternative rap scene.

Noname

If you don’t know who Noname is by now, you should get to know her. The Chicago native’s flow is a mix of spoken word and rap, and her 2018 album Room 25 received a Metacritic score of 93/100 (yes, it’s that good). Noname’s music is deeply introspective and powerful, making her one of the most compelling artists of recent times.

Asian Doll

When I started brainstorming for this list, my good friend texted me “you better have Asian Doll on it.” Asian Doll is one of the fiercest ladies on this list, with a “don’t-mess-with-me” attitude that’s reflected in her music. With club-ready songs that will have you feeling confident, this list wouldn’t be complete without Asian Doll.

Saweetie

Saweetie is best known for her breakout hit “ICY GRL,” a track that plays at party after party and spawned a Kehlani rework, but she’s so much more than that one song. Her debut album High Maintenance was packed back to back with danceable hits, showing Saweetie is not a rapper to underrate.

Chynna

Chynna brings a rawness and honesty to her music that draws you in and leaves you wanting more. With mosh-ready production under her hazy flow, Chynna’s music is a force to be reckoned with. In Chynna’s words, her music is “for angry people with too much pride to show how angry they are.”

Kamaiyah

Oakland’s Kamaiyah is hyphy through and through. With her wild flow and inventive beats, Kamiyah creates music that has the essence of the Bay Area on a summer night. She’s only 24 and has already worked with the likes of YG and Drake and was on XXL’s 2017 freshman list —  she’s a powerhouse.

By Mackenzie Glaubitz

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Welcoming ‘Cuse Can!

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Welcoming ‘Cuse Can!

Who can? Cuse Can!

On April 6th, University Union, The National Panhellenic Council, and the Student Association are proud to present Cuse Can!, a day to appreciate and acknowledge differences and make a change! Along with classroom discussion sessions, there will be a comedy set by Tiffany Haddish in the afternoon and a concert featuring Flipp Dinero and Pusha T at night. Student Association will be hosting two panels in Watson Theater in the afternoon: “What We Need To Be Talking About,” a discussion of on campus issues, at 4:15 PM and “Just Up The Block,” discussions of issues happening in our greater community, at 5:15 PM. Cuse Can performances will be held in Goldstein Auditorium, with Tiffany Haddish in the afternoon and Flipp Dinero and Pusha T at night!

It’s impossible to not love this triple threat (comedian, actress, and producer!). Most people know Tiffany Haddish from the smash hit “Girls Trip” or her role on “The Last O.G.”, but Haddish has a plethora of projects on her schedule that will keep us all laughing. She’s also a history maker: she was the first black female comedian to host “Saturday Night Live” in 2017, which earned her a 2018 Emmy for “Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy Series.” If that all wasn’t enough, she’s also a writer; her memoir “The Last Black Unicorn” made the New York Times bestseller list and earned her a 2019 Grammy nomination for “Spoken Word Album.” Her show is guaranteed to have you laughing all afternoon!

Come see the artist behind “Leave Me Alone,” the song that you always catch yourself humming because it’s that catchy. Flipp Dinero is more than his hit, though; with his bulletproof bars and a unique sound, he proves that he’s an artist that’s here to stay. I’m not the only one that thinks so; numerous stars have co-signed him, from Drake to Kim Kardashian, and DJ Khaled personally signed the Brooklyn artist to his label. Come dance the night away to Dinero’s infectious music and see what everyone is raving about!

One of hip hop’s icons is making his way north for Cuse Can! Meet Pusha-T: 4x nominated recording artist, President of G.O.O.D. music, sneaker designer, and activist. Besides creating Daytona, one of the most critically acclaimed albums of recent times, Pusha T has advocated strongly for criminal justice reform and campaigned for Hillary Clinton’s 2016 Presidential Election, making him one of the most politically involved rap stars of recent times. Pusha T is electric onstage, stunning sold out audiences night after night with his lyricism and talent. You don’t want to miss this!

Tickets are available at the Schine Box Office or online at boxoffice.syr.edu: $5 for Stand up, $5 for Concert or $8 for both (bundle option only available at Schine Box Office)! All proceeds will go to Hendricks Chapel Food Pantry and Hillside Children’s Center.

By Mackenzie Glaubitz

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